Science on Stage Europe The European platform for science teachers

Blog

Blog entries tagged with teacher exchange remove filter

From Italy to Iceland: Teacher Exchange on GeoQuest

Last summer Sabina Maraffi and Ásdís Ingólfsdóttir met as teacher delegates of Science on Stage Italy and Science on Stage Iceland at the European Science on Stage festival 2017 in Debrecen, Hungary. Sabina presented the project 'Who killed Maya Foster? A CLIL CrimeQuest, interactive computer class Role Playing Game'. Now she and Ásdís came up with the idea to do a teacher exchange and develop a new project together which combines the idea of Sabina to use computer games in STEM classes and to do research on geology and geography.

For developing the GeoQuest project Sabina went to see Ásdís in Iceland where she learned about the Icelandic school system, visited Ásdís school and did field trips to experience the Icelandic geology, geography and nature. Sabina also met with Haraldur Gunnarsson, a teacher and professor of Earth Sciences who is joining the project too. On site Sabina gave geology lessons with the GeoQuest project to second year students. Therefore she chose several interdisciplinary science adventures about the Vesuv for the Icelandic students, so they would not only improve their STEM skills but also gain knowledge about nature, history and culture of her own home country Italy. Furthermore, Sabina shared the game with other Icelandic teachers.

As a next step Ásdís will visit Sabina in Italy. But before she is going to develop a GeoQuest game with her students on Iceland's geology and geography for challenging the Italian students.

 

Phantoms and Physics: New joint project between the Netherlands and Spain

On 17 April 2016 Silvio Rademaker from the Amadeus Lyceum in Vleuten (Utrecht) travelled to Spain for five days to meet Nuria Muñoz Molina from La Inmaculada School in Algeciras. Both teachers met at the European Science on Stage festival 2015 in London and decided to go for a joint project named 'Phantoms or Physics'. 

The visit was very successful: After meeting the principal and Spanish colleagues, Silvio Rademaker presented the project, his school and his work in the Netherlands to the students of 'La Inmaculada' who participated enthusiastically and succeeded in performing a difficult group experiment where they shrank a plastic bottle from a distance, only by using their mental powers! 

After that Silvio Rademaker and Nuria Muñoz Molina were invited to visit a local radio station and explain all about the joint project.

The following day they went to the 10th annual science fair Diverciencia in Algeciras where they presented their project and gave a little show for visitors making their personal possessions disappear (and reappear again) among lots of other experiments about phantoms. Sharing a fantastic lunch with teachers from lots of schools in the South of Spain they had the opportunity to exchange ideas and future projects about science and to hear new ideas and different approaches surrounding the same subject.

The fair was visited very well by thousands of pupils and visitors and the presentations were made by pupils of 'La Inmaculada'. During the fair Silvio Rademaker and Nuria Muñoz Molina could not participate in the competition, but some months later the project won the gold medal in the competition 'IV Certamen Jóvenes Investigadores in Algeciras' - what a great success!

Learn more about the project and its experiments at phantomsorphysics.wordpress.com

UK and the Netherlands: Teacher exchange in progress

At last summer's Science on Stage European festival in London David Teasdale from UK met Hans Mulder from the Netherlands. The teachers became friends at the event and decided to carry out a joint project together. Both teachers were interested in slime mould and thought their students could learn much about both the mould itself and the scientific method by carrying out practical experiments.

Teasdale and Mulder started working on a project together and in early February, Hans Mulder came over from the Netherlands to Bolton with the support by Science on Stage Europe. He visited the school of David Teasdale, Bolton School Boys' Division, and got to observe some lessons and learn about the way of teaching science in UK. Mulder had prepared some resources which he had brought over from the Netherlands, and used them to deliver a lesson of his own to one of the classes at Bolton School.

The resources were pieces of piping with four pieces of string running through the pipe. The piping was opaque so the students could not see inside, instead they had to try and suggest what was going on inside the pipe, based on the behaviour of the strings when they were pulled. There were nine different tubes Hans Mulder had made, each with strings which responded differently. To the British students it was a really interesting lesson and Hans Mulder kindly left the resources with Bolton School as the students loved them and wanted to use them again.

David Teasdale and Hans Mulder also used the time together to work on their joint project. They shared resources on the growing of slime mould and discussed a medium term plan for the project. Hans Mulder met with David Teasdales' technician to discuss the technical aspects of growing slime mould and saw the set up. He also met the students who are carrying out the project and discussed it with them. 

'The visit of Hans definitely accelerated the progress of our project' says David Teasdale: 'I hope to pay a return visit to his school at some point in the next academic year.'

From Goslar to Budapest: Continuing exchange programme with students from Germany and Hungary

After Márta Gajdosné-Szabó from the Kempelen Farkas Gimnazium in Budapest visited her Science on Stage partners Ute Eckhof and Dr. Walter Frank from the Christian-von-Dohm-Gymnasium in Goslar with four of her students in September last year (see blog report 07.09.2015) the German students now went for a return visit from 06-12 April.

Together with their teachers Ute Eckhof and Axel Klaus the German students got acquainted with the Hungarian culture, language, history and, of course, chemistry through mining. To solve scientific problems the Hungarian and German students simulated a multi company using a common language and thereby not only deepened their skills in doing research but also in how to communicate as an international group!

The exchange project ‚Mining in Europe‘ is part of the German-Hungarian teaching concept ‚Worldwide Mountains‘, jointly initialised by Ute Eckhof and Dr. Walter Frank and Márta Gajdosné Szabó. At the Science on Stage Festival 2015 in London the German-Hungarian Joint-Project was rewarded with the European Science Teacher Award for its enthralling idea how to combine metals science in chemistry with local mining.

 1 2 >